Ghostly Tales (1896) by Wilhelmina FitzClarence

1.jpg

Wilhelmina FitzClarence (1830-1906), Countess of Munster lived a fairly standard peeress’s life – despite being an illegitimate granddaughter to William IV of England. As a young girl she travelled widely in Europe, eventually marrying her first cousin William in 1855. The couple lived in Brighton and had nine children.Wilhelmina’s first novel, Dorinda (1889), about a female art-thief, was praised by Oscar Wilde for its characterisation, although her second novel, social satire A Scotch Earl (1891), was less well-received. She also wrote numerous short stories and articles for periodicals, and published an autobiography in 1904.

Ghostly Tales (1896) consists of stories in a supernatural and/or Gothic vein and some (as in Isabella Banks’ Through the Night, which it in many ways resembles) are supposed to be drawn from stories recounted by its author’s family and friends. This is reflected in the milieu of the tales’ protagonists – the grand European tour, the marriage market and aristocratic country and town life. Although the collection contains several stories which fit easily into the traditional Victorian ghost story genre (most notably ‘The Ghost of My Dead Friend’) the volume contains a wide breadth of ‘weird’ or uncanny phenomena – from religious visions and animal telepathy to the narrator’s unsettling encounter with a mentally disturbed young man.

2.jpg

Ghostly Tales [Kindle]

Ghostly Tales [Epub]

Ghostly Tales [PDF]

A facsilmile edition, containing a number of illustrations, can be downloaded for free from from the British Library.

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Ghostly Tales (1896) by Wilhelmina FitzClarence

  1. stylesofdying Post author

    It looks like Dropbox has changed its interface.

    To download, click on the file you want then, in the new window, click on the … button in top right of the screen and choose ‘Download’!

    Reply
  2. cmikolj

    Many thanks for this download – I am familiar with most supernatural literature of this period but had never heard of this one. You’ve made my day – a book of ghost stories I haven’t read!

    Reply
    1. stylesofdying Post author

      Thanks. The title is a bit misleading ‘slightly unusual’ or ‘uncanny’ tales would be more fitting. But there are definitely some ghost stories in it – so I hope you enjoy them!

      Reply
  3. Paula Cappa

    This author is a new one for me. I’m often looking for female writers in this era for my blog. She might make an interesting choice for Women in Horror Month next year. Thanks for posting.

    Reply
  4. Pingback: This looks like a little bit of me, does this. – Jack Rollins – Bringer of Fear

  5. Jessica

    Hi there, just wanted to thankyou so much for continuing to take the time to update this website! These stories bring me so much enjoyment and finding them all in one place is just fantastic. Thanks again.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s